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AssessMs: Diagnosing Multiple Sclerosis with Microsoft’s Kinect

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AssessMs Taps Microsoft’s Kinect Technology To Diagnose Multiple Sclerosis

When Microsoft introduced its Kinect motion-sensing camera, the technology brought a new element to console gaming. Kinect tracks and captures a player’s movements, then translates them into the play of a game. Now a large pharmaceutical company is partnering with Microsoft to apply that technology for a therapeutic purpose. In a new application of games in health care, Novartis is betting that the Kinect technology can be used to track the progress of multiple sclerosis, and in turn, play a role in developing new treatments for the disease.

The muscular dysfunction of MS affects more than 400,000 people in the United States; 2.5 million people around the world, according to Healthline. The disease is diagnosed through a series of physical tests, which are observed by a physician. But MS is challenging to diagnose, in part because physicians rely on their memory and their eyesight to evaluate changes in a patient’s symptoms, explains Bloomberg Business. Imprecision in scoring these tests also causes problems for the drug companies trying to develop new treatments. The inconsistency means that drug companies need to test their therapies on more patients, which takes more time and money.

Novartis is working with Microsoft to develop a system called AssessMS. The technology will use a Kinect motion-sensing camera to capture the physical movements that patients do in the standard MS-diagnostic tests. Software will recognize the degree of impairment, which will help physicians diagnose the disease. At least, that’s what researchers are hoping.

More work still needs to be done. Microsoft still needs to prove that its technology will work in this new diagnostic application. And Novartis will need to get the Food and Drug Administration to approve the new device for use in this new diagnostic application. But researchers are hopeful. If it works, a technology that was originally developed to make console games more interactive for players will have a hand in paving the way for new treatments for patients.

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3 Games in education Examples For the Classroom

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Looking at games in education for the classroom, as a teacher you might wonder if it is right for you. So let’s see if we can’t answer that question, shall we? Every child learns differently. This is a fact. Some children learn from reading a book. Some children learn from hands on experiences. Yes, some children even learn from playing video games. In fact, history teaches us that most children do.

As this technological age develops, it is more important than ever to keep up with the times. There are a number of computer games that will help you keep your students’ attention as well as help them to learn in a new and exciting way. These games include ABCya!, FunBrain, and even the game that has lasted through the ages, Carmen Sandiego.

ABCya! is an online gaming world for grades Pre K through the 5th grade. The focus is on mainly math and language arts skills. The children can choose which game they would like to play by grade level. These games can also be played on their parents tablets if their parents want to expand the learning to include at home play.

FunBrain is a favorite of a lot of home schooled students. The home school platforms K12 and Mosaica use FunBrain in their curriculum. FunBrain has videos, games, and even quizzes to insure that the children are learning the material. The focus is mainly on math, language arts, and science.

Carmen Sandiego has been a long time favorite of educators. Carmen Sandiego teaches geography and history in a way that no other option can. Children remember what they learn from the mysteries that they have to solve in order to find the ever elusive Carmen Sandiego, and they do it without even realizing that they are learning.

Games in education are great tools to help you as a teacher reinforce your lessons so that your students get it on their level. These are only a few of the games that a teacher can have in their toolbox. Children will have fun and learn all at the same time.

Credit image: flickr

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Video Games Research Turns Into Physical Therapy for Stroke Patients

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Video Game Research Reveal Opportunities for Application in Stroke Therapy

There are two schools of thought on the best way to help regain the muscle movement and dexterity lost by those who suffer a stroke. Some people believe that patients should not move at all unless in the presence of a physical therapist, according to David Putrino, director of telemedicine and virtual rehabilitation at the Burke Medical Research Institute. But the other, diametrically opposite view, holds that a stroke patient should move as much as possible. Putrino subscribes to the latter view and he found medical evidence to support that position. Dabbling with games in health care, he developed a video game with applications in physical therapy for stroke patients.

The game employs a small, hand-held motion-capture device that translates the movement of a patient’s hands into the movements of an airplane, explains Metro. Using the device, the patient must attempt to fly the plane through obstacles that appear on a tablet’s screen. As the patient’s hand movement improves, the game becomes progressively harder.

The Burke Institute conducted a six-week pilot study using the video game as stroke therapy. That study was originally intended to see if chronic stroke patients would be open to, and comfortable with, a video game approach to physical therapy. But the researchers also found measurable clinical benefit in those six weeks. Even more, the pilot study’s results suggest that the game brought about a patient response that encouraged them to keep playing the game in order to get better.

“Playing the video game got them excited about therapy,” Putrino told New York’s ABC7. “It got them thinking about therapy and thinking, you know what, I’m going to beat that level next time so I’m going to practice at home.”

Putrino hopes to eventually bring the product into patient homes, where it could become a regular and routine part of the patient’s day. The researchers are also looking at expanding the game’s application to physical therapy for other conditions, such as cerebral palsy.

But researchers concede that expanding the game for use with young kids will require improvements in gaming technology. Putrino said that young kids, who are very familiar with the look and feel of modern video games, have higher expectations for their games – even if the game is for the benefit of physical therapy. But with this stroke research in hand, the Burke Institute researchers now have the foundation to build games with broader physical therapy applications.

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Detecting ADHD Early with CogCubed’s Groundskeeper

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Groundskeeper: An Innovative Game That Spots ADHD Early

ADHD is one of those medical issues that come into the limelight more often than not for those diagnosed with the condition being over medicated, or receiving false diagnosis. ADHD is however a true problem for all ages of people, and in most cases it is both hard to treat as well as diagnose. Games in health are improving the experiences of consumers, and developers at CogCubed are working for those that suffer from ADHD.

Gamification of healthcare is a useful device in measuring the attention span of the players of a game with simplistic mechanics. With the implementation of small blocks that depict renderings of video game characters or scenes, developers at CogCubed have made something fun yet scientifically relevant. The MIT Media Lab has weaved these ingenious little cube instruments that sparked the idea of this whack-a-mole style game known as “Groundskeeper.” The game is capable of determining the two different types of ADHD. Interactivity makes the cubes the perfect devices to allow the developers at CogCubed to test the behavioral well-being of people. ADHD is found in over 9% of the U.S. population. The methods CogCubed have developed in trying to revolutionize the way ADHD is recognized are substantial for diagnosis.

The Games for Health Journal posted the great results for the product in 2013 showing that Grounds Keeper confirmed the diagnosis of 70% in all categories of ADHD, in all test subjects. A mixture of MDs and PHDs developing the software leads one to believe that this product will soon be presented to children in psychiatrists’ offices around the United States. Hopefully, more games like this can help to solve the problems medical sciences alone have yet to decipher or work toward a nicer experience for consumers.

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Exploring Career Options with NCSU’s Gamified Course

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Nazareth College Career Services held its first Spring Job & Internship Fair in the Kidera Gym. 50 + organizations such as Excellus Blue Cross/Blue Shield, Paychex, and Rochester AmeriCorps were in attendance. The fair offered Nazareth students exclusive access to recruiters for full-time and part-time jobs, as well as internship opportunities for all majors. #NazarethCollege #GoldenFlyer #NazarethInterns

How a Gamified Course Helps College Students Choose Careers

For some college students, the hardest academic choice they need to make is selecting a major. The difficulty is compounded by their awareness that what they study in college has a strong bearing on what they will do for their career. North Carolina State University has turned to gamification to help students with these choices. By making a game part of the education process, university officials say that they can help students make more informed choices about their college studies and their future careers.

NC State’s Distance Education & Learning Technology Applications developed a game for the university’s Introduction to Sport Management course. The game was developed in Moodle (which stands for Modular Object-Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment), an open-source learning management system, explains EdTech Magazine. In the game students must acquire points within 14 different skill sets applying to 10 different career paths. These careers range from media, sports tourism, coaching, or general manager of a sports team, among other choices. Edwin Lindsay, a professor in the Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management, tells EdTech that the university’s goal was to expose students to various entry-level jobs available, but do so in the form of a game. He adds that conducting the course as a game makes students aware of other jobs that might be a better match.

The game rewards students for completing an activity, and rewards them again for achieving a certain number of points. The game not only helps students select careers, it also helps them learn more about their strengths and weaknesses so they can figure out what to improve to prepare for a specific career. One of the advantages of the game, Lindsay says, is that it gives students the opportunity to try things in an environment where it’s O.K. to fail. That way, students are better prepared to succeed when they move on to careers in the real world.

The game is not just limited to sports management. Based on the results of the game in that department, other university departments are adapting it for their students. EdTech says the NC State’s horticulture department has launched gamified courses, and others departments are considering following suit.

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Need help with behavioral science and gamification? Get in touch with our boutique consulting agency Dopamine.

5 Examples Gamification in Consumer Engagement Space

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The gamification market is estimated to be worth about $2.8 billion, having increased 10 fold over 3 years. Widely used in staff training or education, there is now a growing trend toward adding gamification to drive consumer engagement and loyalty.

The online environment vastly increases the possibilities for the use of gaming to engage customers . You can turn your instructions into simulations that can demonstrate your products. Virtual tours have become popular for the travel industry and real estate industries. Virtual environments can also apply to the use of products. Customers can try products in a virtual environment and be rewarded for their efforts.

Gamification in Marketing:

To help it in its competition with larger snack manufacturers, as a brand-builder, San Francisco-based Klip, manufacturer of Popchips began inserting virtual coupons into hundreds of mobile games. These coupons pop up as rewards for points and are redeemable for free bags of chips .

Foursquare is a mobile app in which customers at restaurants “check-in” to virtual locations and get rewarded for the number of check-ins, ultimately earning the title of “Mayor.” Restaurant owners describe it as a “virtual maitre’ d.”

Simulation for Customer Onboarding:

Gamification is the perfect tool for customer onboarding. If you are in an industry where you have to teach customers how to use your products. Deploying a simulation or interactive element into your sales presentation or into your instructions can be a perfect addition. This approach can be used to introduce existing customers to new versions of a product, to demonstrate advanced features, or when customers are renewing their existing subscriptions.

  • Garmin receivers have a simulation mode built into their GPS units to get their customers up and running.
  • Dassault Systems has been offering simulation software to manufacturing business customers to train operators. This kind of training has become increasingly prominent in technical and medical fields.

Gamication for customer loyalty:

Gamification can be a form of feedback. Reward customers for participation for asking questions, making suggestions, or making referrals using redeemable tokens that can be exchanged for rewards like increased data storage space or merchandise. A form of gamification has long been part of loyalty programs in Starbucks and other retailers. Purchases are rewarded with points or “stars” which translate into free merchandise. As customers accumulate stars they rise in rank and can expect more rewards as they advance. The Starbucks “My Starbucks Rewards” program makes use a mobile app to offer rewards for purchases.

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Need help with behavioral science and gamification? Get in touch with our boutique consulting agency Dopamine.

Applying Games in Education As Learning Models

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With recent incentive from President Obama, games in education are taking off anew. According to a recent article from Gamespot, the president has just initiated a $4-million plan called “Computer Science for Everyone” which may look toward game models as a learning method. To quote Whitehouse Deputy Director Tom Kalil, “Certainly video games are an entry point for some young people. The reason why some kids might get interested in computer science is because they like to play them, but they also want to make them.”

Video game companies are on board with timely new updates, such as Microsoft’s Minecraft. Their Minecraft: Education Edition is designed to update the older MinecraftEDU by offering new environments and interface features for building, as well as offering students the ability to work on their projects from home in addition to in the classroom. According to a January, 2016, article in The Guardian, one drawback of the new software is that it’s written in C++, which is incompatible with the older java script of MinecraftEDU. However, Microsoft is hopeful this won’t deter their loyal gamers too much, and they are counting on the new edition to become popular with brand new young users in classrooms.

Another viable piece of software is the latest edition of Classcraft, which is a role-play game designed specifically for use in the classroom. Classcraft won the 2015 National School Board Association’s Technology Innovation Showcase Award. According to a 2014 Venturebeat.com article, there were 7,000 children in 25 countries using Classcraft at that time. Educator Shawn Young, who uses Classcraft in his classroom, was quoted as saying about his students, “The second they get into class, they want to know what’s going to happen [with the game].” Our 2013 article explains the basics of the Classcraft premise. In the Fall of 2014, Classcraft debuted an edition that, according to The Journal, features “free iOS apps for iPhone and iPad; interactive forums; student analytics; customizable characters; and new Spanish, German and Dutch translations.

So if you’re a teacher and you remember enjoying “Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego” and “Sim City”, then you are probably in a good place to lead your students into the realm of growing demand for updated gamification in the classroom.

Image credit: Wikimedia

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Improving Surgical Skills with Medical Simulations

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NEW ORLEANS (April 17, 2012) Rear Adm. Elizabeth Niemyer, director of Navy Nurse Corps and deputy chief of Installations and Logistics, performs CPR on a medical simulation device used by students at Louisiana State University Health Science Center. The event took place during New Orleans Navy Week, one of 15 Navy weeks planned across America for 2012. Navy weeks are designed to increase awareness in cities that do not have a significant Navy presence. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Joshua Treadwell/Released) 120417-N-SE516-009 Join the conversation http://www.facebook.com/USNavy http://www.twitter.com/USNavy http://navylive.dodlive.mil

Studies Reveal New Ways Simulators Can Improve Surgical Skills

Two studies are taking a fresh look at an old standby of medical education and game based learning: simulators.  With growing focus on optimizing education and skill in medical practitioners, tools and curriculum for their training are being given another look.

Simulation is routinely used in surgical education for residents. The standard protocol is to utilize virtual training, covering one procedure until residents show proficiency in that surgical area.  The resident is then able to move on to the next module and continue training.  The American College of Surgeons reports that researchers at Drexel University found that overlearning, or training beyond the point of ability, with a surgical simulator resulted in a better outcome.  Surgical trainees who overlearned with simulators reduced the learning curve, had a higher degree of mastery, retained the learned information longer, and preformed their procedures 20% faster than those who only trained until competence. Study author, Dr. Castellanos hopes that, “If we combine overlearning with starting residents doing more complex things early in their training, we think we can train a more efficient and better surgeon.”

Nursing education is the focus of a research study done by Dr. Clarke, head of Neurosurgery at Dalhousie University in Halifax,Nova Scotia. Medical training software PeriopSim has been chosen as the simulation tool being used in this study.  The study builds on the knowledge gained in 2009 when simulation innovation NeurotouchTM was used to perform the world’s first virtual brain surgery. While simulation is becoming widely used in curriculum for both graduate and undergraduate nursing programs, research studies into the efficacy of such training and its implementation are scarce. Perioperative nurses presently gain surgical skills in the operating room under the tutelage of a more experienced perioperative nurse.   This limited clinical instruction has proven to be inadequate as these nurses increasingly must function competently in a variety of specialties employing a number of intricate procedures and all which utilize an assortment of instruments.  The new methods of instruction for advancing knowledge and skill are vital to keeping up with the mounting professional expectations of perioperative nurses.

Simulation training is rapidly becoming a staple in medical education. As technological and educational trends merge, reexamining and renovating the role of simulation training in practitioner education could be key to delivering cost effective and safe methods of cultivating increased skill mastery and surgical team efficiency.  For more ways gamification is revolutionizing education, healthcare, and more, please visit our website.

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Boosting Children’s Physical Wellbeing with Zamzee

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090611-N-3271W-003 CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (June 11, 2009) Local area children test their fitness skills during a Junior Seal Fitness Challenge at Warner Park organized by the Navy and the Chattanooga Parks and Recreation Department. The event is in conjunction with Chattanooga Navy Week, one of 21 Navy Weeks planned across America in 2009. Navy Weeks are designed to show Americans the investment they have made in their Navy and increase awareness in cities that do not have a significant Navy presence. (U.S. Navy photo by Senior Chief Mass Communication Specialist Gary Ward/Released)

Zamzee Gamification Software Turns Kids on to Physical Activity

Health care experts warn that child obesity rates are rising to alarming levels. With the increase in obesity-related medical conditions, such as diabetes, it’s no wonder that parents and health professionals alike are looking for ways to keep children healthy. A good diet is one part of the equation. But an equally important part of child health is physical activity. Gamification startup HopeLab developed a technological way to keep kids on the move while tracking this activity at the same time. The company’s gamification software is called Zamzee.

While many children may understand that physical activity is good for their health, getting them to exercise and to stick to any kind of physical routine is challenging. According to HopeLab, child physical activity declines 60 percent between the ages of 9 and 15. That’s no coincidence. That age range coincides with the period when child use of computers, mobile devices, and other technology increases.

Zamzee takes children’s affinity for technology and turns it into a way to engage their interest in physical activity. Children wear a Zamzee activity meter that tracks their physical activity and calculates the intensity of the movement. The tracker works with the website Zamzee.com, which engages children by presenting them with games and challenges that they must complete by doing physical activity, explains Xconomy.

Besides presenting children with physical games, Zamzee.com also allows children to track their own activity. Kids can create their own avatar on the website and follow that avatar’s progress from level to level as they increase their physical activity. Zamzee encourages more physical activity through a rewards system that awards tech gadgets, gaming consoles, gift cards, and donations to charity.

There’s evidence that Zamzee works. In six-month study co-sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the physical activity of children using Zamzee increased by nearly 60 percent. According to HopeLab, that physical activity had a positive effect on the risk factors associated with diabetes and heart disease.

The potential for Zamzee to become part of a comprehensive approach to health caught the eye of one company. Welltok, which provides a health optimization software platform to health insurance companies and healthcare organizations, acquired Zamzee in order to incorporate it into its CafeWell software. As part of a larger company, Zamzee has the potential to reach and help many more children.

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A Brief Overview of Gamification in Healthcare

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Use of games in healthcare has become a focus among startup companies, largely concentrating on combining self-monitoring with games. The question remains if these new gamification products can lead to sustainable modification in healthcare behavior, especially among those who need it most. Gamification developers want to focus on the self-management of chronic conditions. Healthcare providers want to offer games to their clients, but privacy restrictions have added some legal an ethical wrinkles in the area of health care gaming design. Privacy restrictions are making it difficult to design healthcare feedback competitive gaming designs for those who would most benefit from them.

Physical Fitness:

  • An app called Pact (available in the App store or Goggle Play) tracks fitness progress on mobile devices. It is a member-driven system. Members who don’t meet their fitness standards have to contribute money into a fund that rewards members who do meet their standards.
  • The tendency among people to compete, especially in areas of fitness, has prompted the development of many apps that compare performances. Some companies are hosting walking competitions, giving their employees wrist worn activity trackers like Fitbits. Scoring on these trackers is the basis for contests and rewards for fitness.
  • Local bicycling organizations have employed I-Phone apps to create competitions out of bicycle trails. In one case, timing is available for each portion of a hilly cross-country trail and times are monitored and ranks among cross-country enthusiasts who get championships for records broken and first-position rankings.
  • Health care insurers are experimenting with health care gaming. UnitedHealth, a Minnesota-based insurer has recently begun offering an app called “OptimizeMe” which allows people to participate in fitness-related contests with their friends.

Medical Training:

Gaming has been tried experimentally in the graduate training of medical doctors. in a trial at the University of Alabama. A web-based medical knowledge competition program was initiated at the university and “leader-boards” were set up. Reports are that the knowledge game, played on both individual and team bases received widespread acceptance and contributed to medical training.

Medications:

Mango Health is an app that rewards  people for sticking to their medicine regimens. The system issues reminder alerts and rewards patients with points every time they take their medication. If they stay on schedule, patients can earn rewards such as gift certificates or dollar donations to charities.

Physical Therapy:

Reflexion Health uses a video feedback system to correct the movements of patients practice physical therapy based exercises. The system works in patients’ homes. Movements are modeled by animated figures.  Motion guided technology compares the patients movements with those of the models and gives guidance and correction suggestions.

Most critics of gamification in healthcare are pointing to limitations in game design as a factor that is slowing adoption of health care games on a large scale. The current fitness competition design has only limited application in health care and applies only to a relatively healthy group. Clearly healthcare gamification is only in its infancy.

Credit image: Pixabay

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Need help with behavioral science and gamification? Get in touch with our boutique consulting agency Dopamine.

Teaching Kids About Cybersecurity with Game Based Training

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Teaching Kids the Importance of Cybersecurity Through Games

Acknowledging a growing need for a digitally literate workforce that uses technology in a safe and secure way, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security created a program that highlights the potential of game based training to educate young students about the importance cybersecurity.

The DHS National Initiative for Cybersecurity Careers and Studies (NICCS) offers links to cybersecurity training games from a mix of public and private sources. These sites offer information and practice with programming, security concepts for computers and networks, defense against cyber attacks, and even practice questions for cybersecurity certification exams. A wide range of material provides a challenge for students at any age — from the cartoon-based Dewie the Turtle to the sophisticated role play of CyberCIEGE.

NICCS recommends cybersecurity gamification as part of a broader “Hands-On Learning” approach for students, meant to augment and expand more traditional classroom work.  The interactive cybersecurity games and quizzes are a flexible and fun way for kids to build key technical skills, especially when added to activities such as clubs and competitions.

Studies in cybersecurity education (such as this one from the International Cyber Center at George Mason University) concluded that using games to deliver training is very effective, given a game that is well-designed, engaging and has a clear end goal. For students, educators and parents, access to game based training in cybersecurity will be an important part of building a highly skilled and tech-savvy workforce. In turn, that workforce will play a critical role in protecting the infrastructure and economy of 21st century America.

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Facilitating Math Learning with DreamBox Learning Platform

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Games in Education Helping to Create Mathematicians

Last year, teachers began to face an uphill battle after the increase of math standards in many states.  School districts nationwide commenced searching for a solution to fill in the learning gaps created by the jump in expectations, but with limited time and teachers, the task seemed almost impossible.   Since math is a “no pass” subject in certain levels of state testing, one game in education stands out as superior at helping teachers win the fight:  Welcome to DreamBox Learning!

Founded in 2006, Dreambox Learning was originally an “at home” offering.  However, in 2010, Reed Hastings (Netflix co-founder) purchased the website and then hired Jessie Woolley-Wilson as the new CEO.  Together, they determined they could fill a greater exigency in math education by updating their program to accommodate schools.  In four years, they saw their users double each year, and are now experiencing an average of one million administered lessons per day.

In review of DreamBox Learning case studies, it is apparent that this program has seen significant results:

  • Aleane Comito Ries Elementary School’s first graders saw an average of over two years growth in one year.
  • Dunbar Elementary School, which was an underachieving facility, saw a fifty percent proficiency gain in less than a year.
  • ICEF Vista Academy saw a proficiency growth from sixty-seven percent to one hundred percent.

In fact, all schools in the case studies experienced significant growth in math competency.

Indeed, a look inside the DreamBox Learning platform helps one to understand why this program is so successful.  Through “Intelligent Adaptive Learning”, this educational game encourages a student’s success.  If a child is showing signs of struggle, the lesson adjusts to the student’s level, before he grows frustrated.  In contrast, the program excels the level of learning for successful students.

The reports aspect of the program is a teacher’s delight, as it helps her easily determine the individual needs of each student in her classroom, and exhibit more effective teaching in her small groups.  DreamBox Learning also offers training and prepared lessons for teachers and aligns them with the state standards.

For students, there are three learning environments:

Grades K-2

  • Graphics, audio, and sound effects are age appropriate.
  • Allows a student to pick his own character.
  • Hosts six adventure categories, with eight adventures each.

Grades 3-5

  • Graphics, audio, and sound effects are age appropriate.
  • The student chooses his own icon graphic.
  • Offers an icon to push in case of reading assistance needs.

Grades 6-8

  • Graphics, audio, and sound effects are age appropriate.
  • The student creates his own avatar for use in the game.
  • Includes a time tracker for a student to see how long each step takes him.

All three learning environments give the user the feel of playing a video game, offer the opportunity to earn incentives (badges and coins to customize the student’s learning area), and include a help button in case the student requires hints or desires a repeated question.

The cost to benefit ratio is phenomenal.  For less than half the cost of one teacher’s aide, a district may obtain a software license for $7,000 per year, or a smaller district may choose a fee of $25 a student per year.  This program offers an application for iPad and is also available in Spanish. Do visit the DreamBox Learning website and try a few sample lessons, but make sure you have plenty of time to play, as you will not want to leave once you get there!

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CataBoom: Sparking Brand Loyalty with Rewarding Games

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CataBoom Integrates Reward-based Games for Marketing Campaigns

Consumers aren’t exactly brand loyal as they were years ago. Consumers evaluate how a product or service benefits them on multiple levels. They are savvy buyers and have access to a lot of information to help them make their choice. A Texas-based company called CataBoom offers tools to integrate reward-based games in marketing campaigns. Through gamification, consumers discover new ways to benefit from engaging with a brand.

CataBoom focuses on rewarding consumers when they engage with brands online. Their digital platform includes tools for businesses to create games with grand prizes, guaranteed prizes, and other rewards. The platform offers options to create landing pages and other important digital assets as part the gamification process. They offer Click & Go or Customizable options as part of the wide range of choices available. The company’s products work with how consumers search for products and discover benefits. Audiences can interact with the games in easily accessible formats, such as through social media, text, and e-mail. CataBoom’s tools also work with Twitter, Facebook, and mobile apps.

According to articles in the Dallas Business Journal and mGamingWatch.com, CataBoom’s reward programs are closely aligned with Pavlov’s studies on classical conditioning. Audiences may be rewarded monetarily, but may also be rewarded in other ways, such as through content. Just like a lottery, the company suggests having a guaranteed prize. Audiences can click on links to learn about chances to win prizes, and enter to win by engaging online in specific ways.

Integrating instant gratification in marketing campaigns through games gives people more ways to interact online. Customer rewards games integrate into various tech platforms and are adjustable to suit people’s behaviors online. CataBoom’s games include large and small rewards, depending on the marketing campaign. For example, someone might win a $100,000 grand prize, or a small prize, such as $2 of their next purchase.

While some people still enjoy clipping coupons, gamification makes rewards large and small more interactive. As people seek ways to save money or find incentives, reward-based games add intriguing new dimensions to brand preferences. Games in digital marketing may just become the wave of the future when it comes to generating customer loyalty.

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Need help with behavioral science and gamification? Get in touch with our boutique consulting agency Dopamine.

Learning to Code Through Gameplay with CodinGame

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CodinGame Offers Computer Language Learning through Playing Games

More and more young people want to learn how to code. However, it’s a challenge to keep students engaged with the learning process. Programming involves extensive practice and problem-solving skills. Online learning platforms with gamification features are popular resources for learning to code at home.

People seeking to learn about computer science, coding, and UI/UX topics earn fun digital awards on educational sites such as Treehouse and Khan Academy. These platforms offer badges, levels, and other types of recognition. Students earn this recognition through watching educational videos, passing exercises or taking quizzes. They then see their badges or awards on their user profiles, which they may share with others.

An TechCrunch article describes a new platform called CodinGame from France, which goes beyond badges and turns programming into an actual game. This website gives students challenges that they must pass in order to advance in the game. These games motivate students to keep learning and challenging themselves, while also having fun.

Perhaps one of the most impressive aspects of CodinGame is the wide array of coding languages to learn through games. Students have their pick of over 25 languages to sharpen their skills and learn new semantics. In its brief lifespan, over 350,000 people have signed up. CodinGame has also received a significant amount of funding, so it will be exciting to find out how the platform evolves.

Gamification is a fun way to learn complex topics. It’s a much-appreciated supplement to textbook learning and classroom lectures. Through gamification, many students pick up coding quickly and practice their skills at their convenience. To learn more about ways gamification is changing the way people learn, keep browsing our site.

Credit image: Pixabay

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Welltok Gamifies Employee’s Journey to Wellness

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Welltok’s Gamified Wellness Platform Offers Customizable Health Programs

It’s not an easy road towards achieving wellness for working adults. With day-to-day obligations and distractions, health is an afterthought for many. Strategies to create incentives and tracking methods are widely discussed but rarely implemented. However, gamification may change the way people view improving their health.

As discussed in articles in The Denver Post and Forbes.com, the start-up Welltok has gained significant attention. It seeks to motivate users, such as employees of companies, to make choices that improve their health. The start-up works with companies and insurers to customize its programs. For example, the platform provides specific ways for people make better diet and exercise choices. It also offers rewards for achievements, including real prizes, such as cash. Part of the goal of this platform includes reducing the costs associated with unhealthy employees for employers and insurers.

More specifically, the Welltok website shows options for companies to browse, such as a personal health itinerary and a CafeWell rewards program. The site discusses potential cost savings in high-value, budget-friendly incentives for users. The programs also available through Welltok includes a condition management option.

It’s interesting to consider how this and other gamified wellness platforms could change the way people view their health. If people receive online coaching and incentives towards healthier, more balanced lifestyle choices, this could dramatically change our culture. This platform may work towards encouraging user responsiveness, and could use data to custom-tailor programs. In the future, wellness apps for kids may become available, in addition to the gamified health apps for adults.

Welltok has received millions of dollars from investors over many years, and interest in creating high-value health platforms continues to grow. Through measuring data and providing real incentives, these gamified approaches may work well to improve people’s lives and health outcomes.

Image credit: Wikipedia

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Need help with behavioral science and gamification? Get in touch with our boutique consulting agency Dopamine.