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EGC’s 2015 Analysis of The Gamification Industry

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The Gamification Industry is Growing and Headed Towards Consolidation

Enterprise Gamification Consultancy has released its latest report on companies that offer enterprise-grade gamification, engagement, and behavior modification platforms. The report offers insight into the gamification industry through data driven analyses across 100 data points. In addition, it provides a comprehensive overlook at the major players in the market, ranking each through an overall gamification platform score.

After researching twelve different companies that use gamification solutions, Enterprise Gamification Consultancy has concluded the following:

  • There are four gamification leaders in the space — GamEffective, Bunchball, Badgeville, and Infosys.
  • There is a shift from short-term gamification solutions to mid to long-term employee applications.
  • The gamification industry market is expected to double by the end of 2016.
  • The gamification industry is expected to consolidate by the beginning of 2017.

2015 was a landmark year for the gamification industry, as SAP became the first large business software vendor to enter the gamification market with its own solution. SAP’s arrival demonstrates a shift for gamification from a niche technology to a mainstream application, one that is expected to lead additional software vendors to the gamification market.

To succeed in the gamification industry, organizations need more than a platform — they need strategy, training, and support. Out of the four leaders in the gamification market, GamEffective’s approach to gamification makes it the overall leader. Its focus on enterprise pain points, range of solutions, and seamless integrations put it ahead of the competition despite that it’s the smallest organization among the market leaders. Enterprise Gamification Consultancy suggests that to have a successful gamification solution, organizations should employ engagement sustainability, data based analyses, and clear, defined objectives.

For more detail on these findings and for all of their conclusions, you can purchase the full report that includes a 10% discount right right here.

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MOBA’s Promote Teamwork While Disparaging Negativity

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Boosting Teamwork in MOBA’s with Positive In-Game Mechanics

For those unfamiliar with the term”MOBA”, it may be time to take notice of one of the fastest growing phenomenon within the gaming industry. MOBA’s, or Massively Online Battle Arenas, have greatly surpassed other popular gaming genres to become the most played games on the PC platform. This shift in the trends of PC players began in 2012 with the game title League of Legends, which has retained its throne ever since; with other MOBA’s such as DotA 2 and Smite creeping into the top ten as well. These types of games have become so popular that they are selling out seats at large venues as well as being covered by major sports networks like ESPN.

Yet the most fascinating aspect of the MOBA game is how players interact with each other. Team work is paramount within a MOBA. The basic premise of any match (which generally take anywhere from 15 to 45 minutes) is the players choose their “heroes” or avatars to battle as, each one with drastically varying powers and skills, and two teams must fight to conquer the enemy teams home base. Various roles must be filled by each player to achieve victory. As in most environments, positivity and teamwork trump negativity and anger, yet emotions can be tough to control while in the heat of a difficult crisis. MOBA’s like League of Legends have implemented systems to improve relations among players as well as weed out poor attitudes. These systems incorporated within the game have shown a stark reality: Constant encouragement and restraining frustration in the face of adversity drastically improves winning percentage.

Riot games, the developer for League of Legends, posted a video in 2013 regarding the statistics of teams who worked together against teams which suffered internal strife. A match in which all players rallied together despite early setbacks had a 54% win rate. A match populated with three angered teammates resulted in a 46% chance of winning, with the number dropping with each subsequent frustrated player. Using player history, Riot games also discovered that individuals that demonstrated positive behavior would win an average 10% more games. Conversely, players with negative report histories averaged to win 35% fewer games. The big statistic Riot games claims is that players who behave in a sportsmanlike manner win 1.7 million more games than the average player on a daily basis.

MOBA’s are now going out of their way to encourage this sportsmanlike behavior.  League of Legends in particular has developed an honor system to promote positive behaviors among gamers. Aspects of this honor system include: acknowledgment of a friendly player, letting a player know their advice was helpful and even an option to let an enemy player know that their attitude was appreciated. These accolades of honor were developed by cognitive psychologist Jeffery Lin, who heads design of the social systems within League of Legends. Other MOBA’s are beginning to follow suit, offering encouraging words on loading screens regarding teamwork and understanding. While not as nuanced as the honor system, it is clear that developers and players are recognizing the correlation between working together through issues and success.

In a world where anger oftentimes results in the ruination of the best intentions, it is admirable that game developers as well as gamers themselves are taking note that to achieve victory in the virtual space, a positive attitude is integral. As the most played PC game in the world, consumer engagement in these team support exercises will undoubtedly have an impact on its players outside of the game. An encouraging word can go a long way in shifting attitude.

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The Current Market of Gamification Sales Platform

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The Gamification Sales Platform Industry is Nascent and Growing According to EGC Analysts

Enterprise Gamification Consultancy has released its latest report on the state of sales platforms that offer gamification solutions. The report offers detailed, data driven insights for any organization looking to gamify its sales solutions or to enhance its existing sales solutions with gamification. In addition, it provides a picture of the current landscape, with company profiles, market breakdowns, and industry predictions.

After researching twenty-four different companies that use gamification solutions, Enterprise Gamification Consultancy has concluded the following:

  • The sales gamification space is nascent, growing, and in demand
  • Most vendors are less than four years old
  • The number of vendors that offer pure sales gamification platforms is expected to double by 2017
  • The number of customers looking to gamify their sales is expected to triple by 2017

According to the report, a major reason for this strong demand is that millennials are entering the sales force. Millennials have shown distinctly different behaviors, expectations, and motivations compared to past generations, and Enterprise Gamification Consultancy expects their preferences to drive companies to adapt their sales processes and tools. Gamification is a solid, strategic offering to improve employee engagement, productivity, and performance processes, and the data created through gamification activities will enable companies to monitor and improve their processes to better fit the next generation of sales representatives.

For more detail on these findings and conclusions, you can purchase the full report that includes a 10% discount right here.

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Code On The Road: Uber’s Secret Coder Recruitment Game

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How Uber Uses Code On The Road Hidden Game to Find Coding Candidates

People who coordinate trips using the ride-hailing app Uber have the reasonable expectation of a convenient journey at an affordable price. But for a select group of riders in a certain markets, Uber offers something more. The company gives some of these riders a recruiting message to work at Uber, a pitch that becomes visible only after the rider completes a game. Many companies are employing technology as a way to gamify employee training. But Uber’s example shows another facet of gamification: a way to first get promising candidates in the door.

Uber isn’t using its game, Code on the Road, to recruit drivers. The game is designed to identify candidates with real computer coding chops who can work on the app itself. The prompt to play comes as a notification on the Uber rider’s smartphone. Those who accept the test are presented three coding challenges to solve, Business Insider explains. In addition to being timed – each challenge comes with a 60-second countdown – players are also scored according to their answers. Those who pass the tests receive a prompt to click a button to get more information about what it’s like working at Uber.

Uber acknowledges the game, but isn’t saying much publicly about it. In a statement sent to Slate, the company said that Code on the Road gives riders “the opportunity to show us their skills in a fun and different way – whether they code on the side or are pursuing a career as a developer.” Those concerned about privacy shouldn’t have too much to worry about. Uber says that it’s not targeting individual Uber riders based on a corporate e-mail address or other identifying information. Instead, the company says that it is offering its game in cities that are technology hubs. According to Business Insider, Uber has been running these coding challenges in Seattle, Austin, Boston, Denver, and Portland, all cities teeming with tech workers.

It’s unclear how successful Code on the Road has been in recruiting coders. Uber isn’t saying whether it has actually hired anyone who first connected with the company through the game. The fact of the matter is that though many companies are inundated with job applications, companies have a harder time finding the right people to apply for their job openings. Offering a game to Uber riders gives the company a way to connect with potential candidates who are both familiar with the service, and also more likely to have the computing background to contribute to Uber’s software.

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Study Reveals Game Based Training Impact on Weight Loss

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Time to start that diet

Promising Research Shows Potential Weight Loss Influenced by Game Based Training

Anyone with a sweet tooth knows exactly how difficult it is to resist unhealthy foods that taste great. Countless diet programs have been established over the years to try to train people to choose healthier foods and avoid empty calories that pack on the pounds. However, the secret ingredient diet plans may be missing is game based training that has shown promising real-world results that lead to additional weight loss.

A study completed by researchers at the University of Exeter and Cardiff University had participants play a video game where the goal of the game was to avoid images of snack foods and desserts that weren’t healthy. Participants played the game four times a week, in 10-minute sessions.

According to the Telegraph, “When the experiment was over, the scientists found that the participants lost an average of 0.7kg and consumed 220 calories less a day whilst playing the game. People also reported “liking” snack foods less after participating.”

Studies like this show that video games can help train the brain to make healthier choices. Participants in the study were also highly favorable about the experience, with the vast majority saying that they would be glad to continue to play a video game in order to increase their motivation for weight loss in real life.

The game in this particular study was fairly simple. A more complex game paired with incentives and other gamification strategies could revolutionize the way companies approach weight loss.

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Shifting Commuting Habits with BART’s Experimental Loyalty Program

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BART Transit System Tries Customer Loyalty to Ease Commuting Crunch

Anyone who takes the subway on a daily rush hour commute understands the experience of being jostled on crowded platforms and crushed inside packed trains. Now one transit system is trying a novel approach to easing the commuting crunch. The San Francisco Bay Area’s BART system is rolling out an experimental customer loyalty program that aims to entice riders to shift their travel outside of peak commute times.

The trial BART Perks program, offered by BART and the San Francisco County Transportation Authority, will recruit 25,000 people who will use automatic payment cards that allow transit officials to monitor their travel patterns, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. But more than gathering travel data, the program will encourage off-peak travel by offering points. With BART’s peak times running between 7 a.m. and 8:30 a.m., points would be awarded by shifting commutes by an hour earlier or later than the peak travel period. Riders could redeem the points for rebates, or they could use the points to play games that offer the chance to win cash prizes.

BART’s attempt to shift commuting habits takes a different approach than some other transit systems. Washington, D.C.’s Metro, for example, charges higher rates during rush hour lower rates in off-peak periods. That congestion pricing approach punishes riders for peak travel. But the Bay Area’s experiment takes its inspiration from successful rewards-based programs in Singapore and India, the Chronicle reports. Those programs, as well as BART Perks, were developed by Silicon Valley startup Urban Engines.

The BART system averages 430,000 trips per weekday, up more than 100,000 daily trips in five years, according to the Chronicle. But if the experimental BART program succeeds in shifting the commutes of a small fraction of those daily travelers, it will have a big impact. Transit officials tell the Chronicle that shifting the commutes of just 1,250 people is the equivalent capacity of a 10-car train – enough to significantly reduce train and platform crowding. In the battle that is the daily commute, that counts for a win.

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Teaching Kids About Asthama and Allergies with Wizdy Pets

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New gamification startups are helping kids enjoy and improve their academic studies. Now, A new startup has created Wizdy Pets, an app that goes further in education. The app aims to teach children between the ages of 6 to 11 how to care for their asthma and allergies.

The venture’s new app is a virtual pet dragon that has asthma. This is not your everyday, happy, fire-breathing dragon because the Wizdy Pets dragon can only breathe fire if it keeps its asthma under control. With the help of the young users, the dragon can breathe fire again, and in return, the dragon teaches them how to care for their asthma and allergies.

The app features two mini-games along with the virtual pet that address the different asthma triggers and the two inhaler-centric technique that was taught to the co-founders by their advisers at the Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital. An important feature of the virtual pet is showing kids the steps to take when an attack begins and what to do to stop it. This important step can save lives, and they are learning it through gamification.

The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology reports that knowledge is the most important part of managing asthma and allergies. When children understand their conditions and what triggers the attacks, they will experience fewer attacks.

With regards to future plans, co-founder and CEO of Wizdy, Nikita Virani, explains that the company is already developing a second app to teach children about food allergies that should be available to the public as early as this spring.

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My Health, My Choice: Enlightening The Impact of Healthcare Cost

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Pharmaceutical Company Turns Healthcare Cost Management Into a Simulation Game

It’s hard to go a day without hearing news about the rising cost of healthcare. Prescription drugs are getting more expensive and health insurance rates are on an annual march upward. By and large, patients have little understanding about the financial pressures that are behind those costs. One company is taking a new approach to try to improve the public’s understanding of health care costs. Astellas Pharmaceuticals has turned the delicate balance of cost management into a game called My Health, My Choice.

The game, which can be played on PCs and mobile devices, puts the player in control of four variables: the number of beds, nurses, general practitioners, and specialists in an entire country. By adjusting each of these variables, players gain an understanding of the interplay between care and cost. Decisions that the player makes in the game impact health care budgets and patient wait times.

The game was developed by Dr. Mauro Laudicella, a senior lecturer in health economics at City University London. In order to ensure that the game offered as close a representation of actual healthcare costs as possible, Laudicella incorporated financial data from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

“Instead of reading a technical publication about the impact of healthcare expenditure, the public can simulate this game to understand the consequence of their choices,” Laudicella told New Scientist magazine.

Astellas’ European division conducted a survey that found that only 24 percent of people think that the British Government spends enough on health care, according to MedicalXpress. The survey also found that waiting times and access to medicines are the two areas that people believe need the most improvement. Through the simulated game, players can gain a better understanding of how the changes they want would impact the cost of their care.

My Health, My Choice offers healthcare cost simulations for Italy, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom. There are no plans, so far, to offer a United States version, though the differences in cost and reimbursement across hundreds of different health insurers in the United States would make a U.S. version of My Health, My Choice exceedingly complex. But with health costs continuing their upward trajectory, the Astellas game offers a novel way to give patients a better understanding about the factors driving those changes.

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EteRNA: Unraveling The Mysteries of RNA Molecules

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EteRNA Leads Crowdsourcing Efforts To Help Scientist Better Understand RNA Molecules

A game called EteRNA is being used to further research into how RNA folds itself into particular shapes. The game is a way of crowdsourcing the modeling to free biomedical scientists to use the shapes for their research.

Recently medical researchers have become interested in the role that RNA has in the human body and the management of diseases. RNA molecules start out as single chains of subunits that quickly form into a stable shape. The shape, determined by the sequence of the subunits, controls how the RNA molecule interacts with the cells of the human body. If medical science were to acquire a better understanding of these shapes, a whole new host of targeted therapies could be developed that will treat cancer and other diseases.

However the shapes RNA resolves itself into can be complicated and are governed by rules that are not well understood. Medical researchers do not have the time or the training to create RNA shapes. Computer modeling has proven to be inadequate as well.

The beauty of EteRNA is that one does not have to have any biological training to play. All one has to have is the ability to solve complex problems, which a lot of gamers have in abundance. The top designs to come out of the game have been used at Stanford University to synthesize RNA molecules where they could be evaluated at that institution’s biochemistry lab.

The game has resulted in a number of scientific papers, the most recent one written by three of the gamers. The paper, published in the Journal of Molecular Biology, discusses how most RNA molecules created in the game are symmetrical.

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Teaching House Fire Fighting Skills with NYU Tandon’s ALIVE

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Using Game Based Simulation ALIVE to Teach Fighting House Fires

Can game based training help fire fighters deal with house fires? Yes. At least this is the answer being put forward by a team of engineers at New York University Tandon School of Engineering. They have developed and deployed a residential firefighting module with the help of five urban fire departments.

This residential firefighting module is the latest training module in an existing simulation tool called ALIVE (Advanced Learning through Integrated Virtual Environments), a training program that has been used by over 50,000 firefighters in all 50 states.

The NYU Tandon Fire Research Group also developed and released previous ALIVE modules. All of the modules teach firefighting skills through game-like simulations of what the individual firefighter might have to do in various scenarios. The modules that concern firefighting scenarios is particularly valuable because extensive training with real fires is too expensive.

The Fire Research Group is developing the residential fire module with help from firefighters in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Houston, and Bloomington, Minnesota. The Tandon engineering team is also working with Underwriters Laboratory.

A $1.5 million Assistance to Firefighters Grant award from the Department of Homeland Security is funding ALIVE development and testing. In addition to game development, that grant money will also finance a mobile game app and a training module that helps firefighters avoid the top cause of death on the job – cardiovascular events. The project team is working with experts at Skidmore College and the Illinois Fire Service to develop the cardiac health module. Click here to learn more about gamification in government.

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AlphaGo Makes Artificial Intelligence a “Go”

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Using Gamified Software to Make Artificial Intelligence a Reality

Software that incorporates game-based training has made great strides in helping people improve their performance. It turns out that software can learn, too. A novel software program developed by a division of Google has finally beaten a human at a board game, which marks a breakthrough that carries implications far beyond gaming. Researchers say this gaming victory marks a promising beginning for artificial intelligence.

Details of the computer program’s victory in the ancient Chinese game Go were published in the scientific journal Nature. To play, players move black and white stones on a grid with the objective of securing territory. Surrounding an opponent’s stone leads to its removal. To win, a player must secure half of the board. While Go’s objective is straightforward, the board presents hundreds of options, each of them leading to a complex combination of strategies and moves. “There are more Go board configurations than atoms in the universe,” Cosmos magazine says. “Computer processors are nowhere near powerful enough to run through them all.”

Google’s artificial intelligence unit, DeepMind, developed a software program to take on a human challenger in Go. Called AlphaGo, the program doesn’t try to process all of the possible Go moves. Instead, Cosmos explains, the program uses a Monte Carlo tree search, which involves sampling the most promising moves and running through different scenarios.

Beyond the Monte Carlo search, AlphaGo also uses what’s called deep learning to assess the quality of its board positions. From there, the software can discover and develop new strategies, an approach that DeepMind scientists compare to human imagination, according to Cosmos.

While these artificial intelligence capabilities sound promising, they do raise potential pitfalls. Human intuition can be wrong, notes The Guardian. Conclusions reached by artificial intelligence software could lead to incorrect answers, just as humans process information and sometimes reach incorrect conclusions. After all, when two humans play a game against each other, the reasoning of one wins out over the other.

But researchers express confidence that AlphaGo’s ability to independently strategize could lead to new problem-solving capabilities in the real world. Demis Hassabis, co-founder of DeepMind, says in a blog post that the potential applications of this artificial intelligence technology spans far and wide – limited, perhaps, only by human imagination.

“Because the methods we’ve used are general-purpose, our hope is that one day they could be extended to help us address some of society’s toughest and most pressing problems, from climate modelling to complex disease analysis,” Hassabis wrote. “We’re excited to see what we can use this technology to tackle next!”

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Amyloids: Enlightening The Public On Alzheimer’s

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Game Based Learning Platform, Amyloids Teaches  About the Cause of Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s is an incredibly terrifying disease that has a detrimental impact on both the patient and his or her family. Although there is little comfort and no cure for Alzheimer’s symptoms as of yet, leaning about the disease may help alleviate the stress that comes along with a loved one going through the horrific reality of being diagnosed with the condition.

In a masterful attempt at an educational game, Alzheimer’s Research UK has created a game called Amyloids that is a wonderful reminder of asteroids, the game teaches players that a build-up of proteins called amyloids damage nerve cells in the brain. The objective of the game is to protect the nerve cells from the amyloid proteins for up to 25 levels. Hopefully, a drug that functions the same as the player of this game will be released soon to save those who are suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.

Games increase brain function and benefit memory along with several other benefits. Unfortunately, the reality is there is no medical solution to a loved one developing Alzheimer’s disease, but games that promote learning could be the first step toward combating the disease from taking hold on an individual.

Medical science is a field that video game producers are breaking into as an outlet to demonstrate the video game industry’s maturity and power to have a positive impact on user experience. Game production giants, such as Nintendo and Ubisoft, are breaking into the medical field to alleviate patient symptoms and experiences. The gamification efforts of medical experts and the video game industry may soon change the world.

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Boosting Classroom Engagement with Kahoot!

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Attempting to attain an entire class’s attention can easily become a losing battle. Whether it’s reviewing for a test, learning new material, or the act of test taking itself, the act of taking formative and summative assessments can become more interactive. This can easily be accomplished by using Kahoot.

With so many games in education nowadays, it is easy to get your hands on something that can make learning fun — but how much information will the students actually retain? Sure, Jeopardy is competitive and the entire class participates, but do your students walk away confident in the material?

Here’s how it works: the instructor logs on to Kahoot’s main screen through their personal device where they can choose a public game or one that they have previously made. Then, the students log on to the Kahoot game page through their smartphones or computers and enter the code to join the game. From there, the instructor can move at their own pace with the class as the students answer multiple choice or discussion questions, or participate in a poll. As each round progresses, the students are able to see who is in the lead and by how many points. At the game’s conclusion, the students can rate the game on entertainment, education, and validity levels. The best part about Kahoot? You can save the students’ data.

In a study provided by the Kahoot! Journal, it reported: “students that did the game-based quiz (Kahoot!), learned 22% more than students that did paper quizzes, and 52% more than students that used the student-response system Clickers.” Since paper exams are what one would typically find in a classroom, it is enlightening to know that the students took away more material from a quiz that incorporates visual interaction over the standard paper format. The Kahoot! Journal also shared that the student engagement of those who participated in the Kahoot game was “46% higher than students doing the paper quiz, and 55% higher than the students that used the student-response system.”

Kahoot is an excellent tool to use in the classroom, not only to further engage your students, but to make sure they come away knowing more than they did at the beginning of class. Signing up for a Kahoot account is 100% free, as is access to their database of pre-made games. Kahoot is a tool that you will use repeatedly in your classroom that your students are sure to fall in love with. With Kahoot, you can leave the paper tests behind and make learning awesome!

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How Serious Games Can Help with Online Fundraising

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If you could apply a game-based approach to nonprofit fundraising online, would you? Online fundraising is a continuous challenge for nonprofits, competing with each other for donations through e-mail or on websites. Serious games in online fundraising events provide motivating ways to raise money for causes and connect with others.

A leading event fundraising platform, Crowdrise, includes gamified approaches on its platform. Individuals or teams use the website to raise funds for charitable or personal causes. The site shows amounts raised, numbers of donors, and goals for fundraisers. Users may also enjoy opportunities to gain points on their profiles as they participate in Crowdrise fundraisers.

Crowdrise includes various game elements, such as leaderboards that display how the competition stacks up. Bonus Challenges are another interesting feature, as well as results tracking features. The site provides inspiration to people interested in fundraising, who may choose to hold contests or offer creative incentives. In addition, recognition is given in continuously updated stats on donors and comments.

Gamification appears in numerous online fundraising events. The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, which began in 2014, received significant attention and raised an impressive amount for the ALS Association. This challenge involved social incentives, such as bragging rights and connecting with others. It also presented the challenge of completing the ice bucket task.

In 2013, a Facebook game called the Half the Sky Movement experienced impressive results. The game, developed in partnership with Zynga, gained thousands of players in the short time span of 3 months. The game format for this movement involved an online adventure where people invited friends to join.

Approaches to using gamification in online fundraising involve features found in traditional board games or video games. Examples of game elements include points, badges, teams, and rewards for achieving specific goals. It also involves a friendly level of competition. People who participate may enjoy the recognition. Team members may enjoy connecting with other like-minded people who are passionate about a cause online. In many instances, people enjoy spreading the word about fundraising games or competitions through social media.

It’s possible to engage people through serious games online in ways other methods don’t. Gamification provides a structure to the fundraising objectives that otherwise sometimes get lost in people’s minds. According to the article “Is Gamification the Future of Philanthropy“, the design of the game is probably just as important as the fundraising event. If the format of the fundraising event compels users to participate and invite others, the effectiveness likely goes up. It’s important to consider human behavior with games, as well as short-term interest versus long-term dedication to a game.

Many nonprofits will likely continue to use gamification in their online fundraising efforts. Even if games aren’t solely used for online fundraising, game aspects can still be applied. This includes incentives such as access, power, relevant rewards, and social benefits.

Credit image: Pixabay

 

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VirZoom: New Gamification Startup Gets Physical!

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VirZoom Combines Virtual Reality and Fitness Technology

Gamification is about to get… “Physical, physical!”

 Ok, it may not be getting Olivia Newton-John physical, but one gamification startup will help you get sweaty enough to keep that New Year’s resolution and shed a few pounds by scoring points in the world of Virtual Reality (VR), that is the Virtual Reality world of Fitness.

VirZoom, a tech startup out of Cambridge, Massachusetts, has combined new VR headset technology with the old-fashioned tech of a stationary bike to created a unique gaming platform that requires you to provide the pedaling power necessary to conquer it’s three games… Pegasus, Stampede! and Go Fast Car.

Correspondent Ethan Gilsdorf recently noted in the Boston Globe that, “Ideally, the VR technology, complete with auditory and visual feedback, will fool the unsuspecting couch potato,” so that according to VirZoom’s CTO Eric Malafeew, ”the bike melts away.” And hopefully, the pounds melt away too.

VirZoom’s headset is being developed to work with Oculus Rift, PlayStation VR, and HTC Vive VR making it easy to work with either your personal computer or Sony PlayStation 4. Simply plug-in your dongle, launch the app, climb onboard the VirZoom foldable bike and pedal away through it’s animated worlds. Your physical fitness will be challenged by multiple levels which run three to 15 minutes long and can be played as a solo workout or in a more competitive, multiplayer mode.

This new trend of VR Fitness could be poised to finally conquer the monotony of treadmills, as well as providing the gaming incentive needed to keep those New Year’s resolutions.

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